IT'S REALLY IMPORTANT TO BE TRANSPARENT WITH DOCTORS WHILE  GETTING CONSULTED,

Yes, it matters: You should tell your doctor because having sex can have an impact on your health in ways you may not notice or feel. Some people with STDs, for example, are unaware that they have an infection because there are no symptoms. However, if a person is not treated, it can lead to serious health problems such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which can result in infertility, or the inability to have a baby.

A sexual history should be taken as part of routine health care, as well as when there are symptoms or physical exam findings suggestive of STIs. In short, a sexual history enables you to provide high-quality patient care by appropriately assessing and screening individuals for a wide range of sexual health concerns.

This is why doctors ask their patients if they are having or have previously had sex. Knowing this allows the doctor to test for "hidden" infections to ensure that everything is in order. It also means that the doctor can provide you with the best advice for your specific situation. If you're getting a prescription for birth control pills, the doctor may want to discuss using condoms to help protect against STDs. Sexual health can have a significant impact on the overall quality of life. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can have a wide range of health consequences, from irritating to life-threatening. Discussing a person's sexual health allows for counseling and the exchange of information about behaviors that may increase STI risk.

Some patients may be reluctant to discuss their sexual history, sex partners, or sexual practices. Some patients may have been abused or traumatized in their lives or while in the hospital. Training in trauma-informed care can assist all clinicians in providing patient-centered, sensitive care in all interactions. Some patients may be victims of intimate partner violence, and seeking medical care may be their only way to access safe resources. Try to put patients at ease and be ready to refer them to appropriate resources. Inform them that taking a sexual history is an important part of routine medical care. In some cases, simply providing all testing options may be the best course of action.

Of course, some people find it awkward to discuss such topics in front of their parents. If you don't feel comfortable or are concerned about your parents finding out, call the doctor's office ahead of time and request a few minutes alone with the doctor. You could also write a note requesting to see the doctor alone and hand it to the front desk clerk when you check-in.

This blog is intended to give you a taste of the discussion points and questions that may be raised. It is not intended to be a diagnostic standard or a comprehensive reference for taking a sexual history. Each person's sexual history should be tailored to their preferences and the clinical situation. To accommodate a person's gender identity, race/ethnicity, culture, or other important considerations, providers may need to modify questions.

It's wonderful that you've decided to ask your parents for assistance, and it's even better that they care enough about you to accompany you to the appointment. Consider informing them as well. They are already aware that you intend to have sex, and they are likely aware that you have already had sex. Even if they disagree with your decision to have sex now, they are likely to want to assist you in doing whatever is necessary to keep yourself healthy and safe.

Some patients may be reluctant to discuss their sexual history, sex partners, or sexual practices. Some patients may have been abused or traumatized in their lives or while in the hospital. Training in trauma-informed care can assist all clinicians in providing patient-centered, sensitive care in all interactions. Some patients may be victims of intimate partner violence, and seeking medical care may be their only way to access safe resources.

Try to put patients at ease and be ready to refer them to appropriate resources. Inform them that taking a sexual history is an important part of routine medical care. In some cases, simply providing all testing options may be the best course of action. Sex is a difficult subject, but the most important thing is to get past any awkwardness and protect yourself. Your mother and doctor can ensure that you receive the best possible care.

AADAR even being a Men's Wellness Platform, understands both genders very well. A relationship is two people's responsibilities where both sides have to contribute equally and understand mutually during their partner's highs and lows. A relationship is both partner’s responsibilities where you have to give your partner the best emotionally, mentally as well as physically. 

By Harsh Shah 0 comment

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